Category Archives: Local History

‘My Quiet Niagara’ and a Storm Warning

'Swandown' Installation

Poet Collette Waller, whose experience of Multiple Sclerosis is the subject of her debut collection, Party Girl (£4.99 at Rosetta Live), is profiled in The Guardian this week.

Storm Warning, a short story collection by Vanessa Gebbie, launches at the Nightingale Theatre (above Grand Central) tomorrow, November 23, at 6pm (free admission, pay bar.)

Submissions wanted for Unthank Books’ annual ‘Unthology’, and Urban District Writer zine. The Writers and Artists Short Story Competition and the Warren Adler Short Story Contest are open until early 2011, while the winning entries in Brighton & Hove Libraries’ We Love Poetry have been announced.

Over at Jubilee Library, historian Frank Flood will be talking about Brighton’s cinemas on Thursday 25th at 7pm (£3), and for teens, a Manga Workshop on Saturday 27th, 11-12.30 (free, book in advance.)

Brighton, as featured in Peter James’ Roy Grace series, is named among Maxim Jakubowski’s Top Ten Crime Locations, while a trailer for the 2011 film adaptation of Graham Greene’s Brighton Rock (set amid the Mods and Rockers riots of 1964) has just been released.

Today’s photo is part of the Swandown Installation, a collaboration between author Ian Sinclair and film-maker Andrew Kotting, on view at the Regency Town House tonight at 6pm (£4, limited). ‘Shoot the Poets’, showcasing original projects by writers, film-makers and performers, is on Wednesday 24th at 8pm, Electric Palace cinema, Hastings (£5).

And for your reading pleasure, a poem (‘You’re Not Cool Enough to Be in My Band’ by John Osborne, Popshots) and a short story (‘For Murder, Just Add Water’ by Ian D. Smith, The New Flesh.)

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Don’t Feed the Poets

Queenspark are looking for volunteer writers for a new book on the Pavilion Gardens Cafe. Submit 200-300 words on this much-loved local landmark by next Friday, November 5, for a chance to participate.

Brighton’s Indepenpress have launched a new imprint, Pink Press, for lesbian and gay lit (not self-publishing.) And Myriad Editions have launched their second annual Writers Retreat Competition. Send in a one-page synoposis of your novel, poetry collection or script, plus 5,000 word excerpt, by December 31 (£5.)

The Guardian First Book Award shortlist includes three novels and two non-fiction works. Also this week, Laurie Penny celebrates the 40th anniversary of Germaine Greer‘s feminist classic, The Female Eunuch.

Finally, the latest ‘Don’t Feed the Poets’ event is Upstairs at Three and Ten, Steine Street, next Friday at 8pm.

Neither Sense nor Sensibility

 

Frank Flood, one of Backstage Brighton‘s writers, will give a free talk and slideshow at Waterstone’s, opposite Brighton clocktower, on Tuesday, October 26, at 7:30pm.

Ed Siegle, whose debut novel, Invisibles, will be published by Myriad Editions next March, will appear at the Sparks Flash Fiction Night, upstairs at Three and Ten on Steine Street, Tuesday November 2 at 8pm.

The Brit Writers’ Awards are now taking submissions from unpublished authors – stories, poems and songs considered. The Sunday Times Short Story Competition closes on Saturday.

‘Fiction Uncovered’ is a new initiative aimed at promoting unheralded writers. Nominations are now open, and eight writers will benefit from a nationwide marketing campaign in 2011.

The life of Andrea Dunbar (Rita, Sue and Bob Too) is remembered in a new film, The Arbor, while Sarah Kane‘s 1995 play, Blasted, is revived at the Lyric Hammersmith, London.

Among this week’s book releases are a new biography of Karen Carpenter, while Jane Austen (of all people) gets a rather unkind, posthumous drubbing for her shabby grammar. In today’s Guardian, Jonathan Jones defends her honour.

Now I’m not a huge Austen fan myself, but really – if Jane wasn’t a genius, where does that leave the rest of us?

Made in Sussex, For Sussex

 

An interview with Katy Ramsay of Brighton’s Pegasaurus Publishing, currently seeking poems with a local theme.

The Legacy Spoken Word event, part of Black History Month, is at the Red Roaster, St James St, tomorrow from 8-10:30pm (£6). If you can’t make it, there will be a final spoken word (and music) event next Thursday, October 28. And the Writing Our Legacy blog is still accepting submissions.

Ellen de Vries heads a ‘Poetry Day’ workshop at Evolution Arts this Sunday, October 24, £45-£38. Among the upcoming, all-day workshops from My Creative Nature are ‘Writing the Elements‘ (November 7, £30)  and ‘Successful Short Stories’ (November 13, £30.)

Points of Fiction is a series of monthly all-day writing workshops at De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill. £35-£50 per session, tutors include Stella Duffy and Bernadine Evaristo.

Creative Choices is a website for anyone who works in the arts, or aspires to. Register now for updates in your field of interest. Mark Brown, editor of One in Four magazine, is building a Wiki listing all UK publications written for, and by, people with mental health difficulties. Send your suggestions to Mentalhealthvoices.

The International Rubery Book Award is now accepting submissions of indie and self-published works. Authors and publishers may apply, entry fee £35. And the free-to-enter Eric Gregory Trust Award for poets closes on October 31.

On a sombre note, an article in yesterday’s Guardian highlights the urgent campaign to save Britain’s libraries, among the many public services under threat of government cuts.

And don’t forget, National Novel Writing Month is coming up in November.

I Have Waited, and You Have Come

Martine McDonagh, whose novel, I Have Waited, and You Have Come, is published by Brighton’s Myriad Editions, heads a line-up including fellow novelist Matthew Loukes and singer-songwriter Michael J. Sheehy, appearing tomorrow night at the latest Ace Stories event (Hotel Pelirocco, 6pm, £3.) For updates, see their Facebook page.

New from Queenspark Books (also on Facebook) this month is Backstage Brighton, tracing the history of theatregoing in Brighton through oral history and vintage photographs.

Finally, are you jaded with politics? Then read Voting, by Yalda at the Afghan Women’s Writing Project.

Writing Our Legacy

St Nicholas Gardens - Helen Diamantopoulo, 2004

Submissions wanted on ‘legacy’ for October’s Brighton & Hove Black History Month.

Two new competitions for unpublished novelists open this week. In Brighton, the Sussex Writers’ Awards; and for women only, the Lucy Cavendish College Fiction Prize 2011.

For historical inspiration, The Brighton Mortiquarian is a wonderful blog uncovering the hitherto forgotten stories of all those buried in St. Nicholas’ Gardens.

New writing from members of Authonomy, the online writers’ community from Harper Collins, who have produced a new anthology of erotica, Dancing in the Dark, released by Night Publishing.

Not for the Faint-Hearted

‘Not for the Faint-Hearted’ is the slightly scary title of a writing workshop at The Skiff, Gloucester St (‘the place with the glass front’) tomorrow from 7pm. Writing for 20 mins, then 10 mins, then 5 mins, and performing each piece of work at each stage. Free, but advance booking required. Go on, drive out those pesky whiny inner critics for an evening…

The September issue of  Leaf Writers’ Magazine, featuring an interview with Joanne Harris, and guides to UK writers’ groups and courses. Digital or print subscriptions available. While you’re visiting the Leaf Books website, check out the competitions page.

In The Guardian, David Peace (Red Riding) offers commentary on No Redemption, Keith Pattinson’s new book of photographs on the Miners’ Strike for Flambard Press. And the US-based Feminist Press has launched ‘Femmes Fatales’, a range of classic pulp fiction by women – including Dorothy Hughes’ In a Lonely Place and Vera Caspary’s Laura.

Back in Brighton, the website for October’s Black History Month has just gone live.