Category Archives: Publishers

Imagination of the Heart

‘Imagination of the Heart’, the final Ace Stories event in the ‘Speaking of the South’ series, takes place tomorrow at 4pm, De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill. It complements the exhibition, ‘Myths, Manners and Memory: Photographers of the American South’, which runs until January 3. Actress Kathryn Pogson (Brazil, Company of Wolves, The Arbor) will read from the works of author Barry Gifford, with blues from Sandy Dillon, and a screening of Gifford’s 1990 collaboration with David Lynch, Wild at Heart. Tickets £3.

‘Word, Image, Sound’ is the latest event in Sussex CCE’s ‘Arts & Minds’ series, at InQBate on Wednesday, November 10, at 5pm.  Includes ‘A Different Sea’, a filmed poem sequence by Abi Curtis and Kim Lasky, and  ‘The Lonely Queen & The White Hart’, a preview of collaborative works by Lewes artist Grace Dunford and writer River Jones.

The Daily Telegraph are currently running a Ghost Story Writing Competition, while Short Story Radio have just announced their Short Story Romance Radio Award for 2011. The Stylist are running a series of daily ‘microfiction’ contests, until November 9. Submit stories of up to 100 words.

‘Canongate Classics’ is a new range of Scottish literature, available in paperback and as E-books. Crime novelist Cathi Unsworth will appear at London’s Ladyfest Ten on November 12.

For inspiration this weekend, try Mslexia‘s workshop exercises on the topic of shoes. And for your reading pleasure, a poem by John Cornford (1915-36), set against the backdrop of the Spanish Civil War.

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Don’t Feed the Poets

Queenspark are looking for volunteer writers for a new book on the Pavilion Gardens Cafe. Submit 200-300 words on this much-loved local landmark by next Friday, November 5, for a chance to participate.

Brighton’s Indepenpress have launched a new imprint, Pink Press, for lesbian and gay lit (not self-publishing.) And Myriad Editions have launched their second annual Writers Retreat Competition. Send in a one-page synoposis of your novel, poetry collection or script, plus 5,000 word excerpt, by December 31 (£5.)

The Guardian First Book Award shortlist includes three novels and two non-fiction works. Also this week, Laurie Penny celebrates the 40th anniversary of Germaine Greer‘s feminist classic, The Female Eunuch.

Finally, the latest ‘Don’t Feed the Poets’ event is Upstairs at Three and Ten, Steine Street, next Friday at 8pm.

‘Winding Keys’ Launch Rescheduled

Jan Bradley’s poetry pamphlet, The Winding Keys, will now be launched by Creative Future at the Amnesty Bookshop, Brighton, on November 12th at 7pm.

Jan Bradley was born in the industrial Black Country of England on the side of a road due to her pure eagerness to live in the oxygenated world. She studied a fine art BSc followed by a postgraduate in specialist fine art printmaking and photography at the University of Brighton. Jan also studied environmental conservation, commercial horticulture, intensive crop production and environmental management skills…and sometime later, a postgraduate and MSc in Health Through Occupation.

She now works as an Occupational Therapist at Mill View Psychiatric Hospital. Her MSc research paper, Exploring the Experiences of Writing Poetry, involved many writers from this site and others. She has been co-facilitating poetry and creative writing workshops with Alan Morrison within her work for Sussex Partnership NHS Trust over the last two years. She lives in Brighton.

“The Winding Keys is a disarming debut, image-rich, prosodically varied — free verse, rhyme, sprung rhyme, rhyme, haiku, villanelle, in only 31 pages — and, most importantly of all, emotionally powerful. Bradley tackles the big subjects once thought to form the core of poetry— life, death, love, loss — with an unabashed persistency of will and a darkly enchanting lyricism” – Alan Morrison

 

Neither Sense nor Sensibility

 

Frank Flood, one of Backstage Brighton‘s writers, will give a free talk and slideshow at Waterstone’s, opposite Brighton clocktower, on Tuesday, October 26, at 7:30pm.

Ed Siegle, whose debut novel, Invisibles, will be published by Myriad Editions next March, will appear at the Sparks Flash Fiction Night, upstairs at Three and Ten on Steine Street, Tuesday November 2 at 8pm.

The Brit Writers’ Awards are now taking submissions from unpublished authors – stories, poems and songs considered. The Sunday Times Short Story Competition closes on Saturday.

‘Fiction Uncovered’ is a new initiative aimed at promoting unheralded writers. Nominations are now open, and eight writers will benefit from a nationwide marketing campaign in 2011.

The life of Andrea Dunbar (Rita, Sue and Bob Too) is remembered in a new film, The Arbor, while Sarah Kane‘s 1995 play, Blasted, is revived at the Lyric Hammersmith, London.

Among this week’s book releases are a new biography of Karen Carpenter, while Jane Austen (of all people) gets a rather unkind, posthumous drubbing for her shabby grammar. In today’s Guardian, Jonathan Jones defends her honour.

Now I’m not a huge Austen fan myself, but really – if Jane wasn’t a genius, where does that leave the rest of us?

Made in Sussex, For Sussex

 

An interview with Katy Ramsay of Brighton’s Pegasaurus Publishing, currently seeking poems with a local theme.

The Legacy Spoken Word event, part of Black History Month, is at the Red Roaster, St James St, tomorrow from 8-10:30pm (£6). If you can’t make it, there will be a final spoken word (and music) event next Thursday, October 28. And the Writing Our Legacy blog is still accepting submissions.

Ellen de Vries heads a ‘Poetry Day’ workshop at Evolution Arts this Sunday, October 24, £45-£38. Among the upcoming, all-day workshops from My Creative Nature are ‘Writing the Elements‘ (November 7, £30)  and ‘Successful Short Stories’ (November 13, £30.)

Points of Fiction is a series of monthly all-day writing workshops at De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill. £35-£50 per session, tutors include Stella Duffy and Bernadine Evaristo.

Creative Choices is a website for anyone who works in the arts, or aspires to. Register now for updates in your field of interest. Mark Brown, editor of One in Four magazine, is building a Wiki listing all UK publications written for, and by, people with mental health difficulties. Send your suggestions to Mentalhealthvoices.

The International Rubery Book Award is now accepting submissions of indie and self-published works. Authors and publishers may apply, entry fee £35. And the free-to-enter Eric Gregory Trust Award for poets closes on October 31.

On a sombre note, an article in yesterday’s Guardian highlights the urgent campaign to save Britain’s libraries, among the many public services under threat of government cuts.

And don’t forget, National Novel Writing Month is coming up in November.

Everyone’s Sense of the World is Invaluable

Everyone’s Sense of the World is Invaluable, an anthology of work submitted by Guardian readers to the Poster Poems blog, is now available at Blurb. This interactive writing workshop is still running, and this week’s challenge focuses on epigrams.

The recent evening of open mic poetry at Hove Library is reviewed in today’s Argus, while Brighton Future of News Group (BFong) are resident at Shoreham’s Agora (part of the Empty Shop Network) all day, so either drop in or visit their live blog for advice on webby stuff and to share stories and mementoes of Shoreham.

Excursions Journal, an online project at the University of Sussex, is currently seeking papers on all matters viral.

Chris Hamilton-Emery of Salt Publishing is preparing to launch a new romance imprint, Embrace Books. And Femministas report that Sweet Love London are looking for a writer of romantic short stories, for a regular website feature.

Write Jobs highlight a free flash fiction contest from the Limerick Writers’ Centre, Ireland. Another poetry mag to watch is the West Midlands-based Urban District Writer.

The Guardian is planning a new dedicated website for young readers, and are looking for contributors.

Sadly, the Public Lending Right body is the latest casualty of the coalition’s ‘Bonfire of the Quangoes’, though Culture Minister Ed Vaizey insists that author royalties will continue to be paid. Over at the Society of Authors website is a list of current arts campaigns, including Save the Arts.

If you’re feeling utterly depressed, take solace in the news that former PM Tony Blair is nominated for this year’s Bad Sex Award, after the recent publication of his autobiography, A Journey.

Is letter-writing a dying art? Perhaps not, says Robert McCrum, so don’t delete your literary emails just yet. Among the weekend’s more interesting book reviews are Crawdaddy‘s take on Women of the Underground: Music by Zora von Burden (Manic D Press), and a classic of social commentary, Henry Mayhew‘s London Labour and the London Poor.

And finally, for your reading pleasure this weekend, Simon Armitage‘s ‘The Present‘ is winner of the Keats-Shelley Poetry Prize.

I Have Waited, and You Have Come

Martine McDonagh, whose novel, I Have Waited, and You Have Come, is published by Brighton’s Myriad Editions, heads a line-up including fellow novelist Matthew Loukes and singer-songwriter Michael J. Sheehy, appearing tomorrow night at the latest Ace Stories event (Hotel Pelirocco, 6pm, £3.) For updates, see their Facebook page.

New from Queenspark Books (also on Facebook) this month is Backstage Brighton, tracing the history of theatregoing in Brighton through oral history and vintage photographs.

Finally, are you jaded with politics? Then read Voting, by Yalda at the Afghan Women’s Writing Project.